Mid Century Modern House Plans 1950's

November 25, 2018 8:20 am by zionstar
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Mid Century Modern House Plans 1950's
Combining contemporary and country home plans can mean combining rustic materials comparable to slate flooring, uncovered ceiling beams, and kitchens with up to date chrome steel appliances , plastic laminated cabinets , glass shelving and butcher block countertops. The ultimate result`s a up to date kitchen which is serviceable and has a cozy , rustic feel. Modern design is about clean surfaces akin to glass and stainless-steel , and using daring colors.

Earlier than we go down to the precise theme of latest house plans, it`s essential to know the basic options of a modern household. For starters contemporary house plan has large windows to provide a lightweight and comfortable atmosphere, high ceilings, versatile and continuous ground plan to accommodate modern furniture and fixtures; and utilization of modern materials, reminiscent of glass, steel , vinyl, stone, marble, and so on.

House designs are highly effective symbols that you can use to create an announcement to the world on who you are. Buildings have an extended lifespan and can continue communicating your assertion to the world long after your departure. Home designs are also a mark of self-actualization.

Mid-Century Trendy house plans are rising in popularity from New York to LA and in every single place in between. These plans embody historic Eichler designs from the Nineteen Sixties, as well as current home plans impressed by the enduring `Case Examine ` modern houses in Los Angeles of the late Forties and early 1950s. Led by Dwell magazine , the mid century aesthetic of open plans, large windows and minimal detailing is rising as one of many key design traits of the early twenty first century.
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The central hall of this small 901 square foot house makes this design similar to midcentury Cape Cod architecture. The roof overhang in the front of the house makes the design more like an American bungalow. But it also looks a bit like the 1940s minimal traditional plans. Perhaps it is this mix of styles that makes this house design “Grandette.”

Ranch style architecture can be found everywhere in the United States, from California to New England. By the 1950s building boom, ranch homes symbolized America’s frontier spirit and new growth as a modern country.

The ranch was developed for mid-twentieth century America. This style was one of the most popular housing types built in the US.

The “Starlight” – Architecture for Sweeping Views The Starlight Will Pour in Through the Curved Front Wall of Glass of This Ranch House. Photo by Buyenlarge/Archive Photos/Getty Images (cropped)

Single Bedroom, Compact Contemporary Home Ideal for Beach, Rental, Vacation, or Micro Living!

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Single storyLow pitched, gable roofDeep-set eaves with wide overhangAsymmetric facadeVisually low to the groundPicture windows and a variety of window shapesProminent chimneyOpen, airy design

“Modette” – The Modern Ranch House The Prominent Chimney of the Modette Design Is Characteristic of Ranch Styles. Photo by Buyenlarge/Archive Photos/Getty Images (cropped)

Although designers call “Grandette” a “typical Western bungalow,” this design is also being marketed with “Sunlight and Ventilation in Abundance.” Developers often appeal to a broad range of tastes and styles within one design—perhaps only to confuse future real estate agents!

The “Ranchero” – A Rambling Ranch Design The Style of the Aptly Named Ranchero Would Never Be Mistaken. Photo by Buyenlarge/Archive Photos/Getty Images (cropped)

Your Desired FeaturesMaster on Main LevelBonus / Flex Room Req’dGreat Room / Open LayoutFront PorchRear PorchWrap Around PorchIn-Ground Basement

“Glory” – A Ranch Home for a Narrow Lot The Glory of This Ranch Style Is That It Doesn’t Need a Wide Lot. Photo by Buyenlarge/Archive Photos/Getty Images (cropped)

At 1,112 square feet of living space, “Tranquility” is a bit larger than other ranch plans in this series of small houses. The floor plan allows you to visualize the outdoor porch and terraces for plenty of “casual indoor-ourdoor living.”

The curved window wall on the facade of this 902 square feet Western ranch house is clearly visible by looking at the floor plan. This modern detail creates an “outside and in” sense of space. Note, too, the size of the garage, 264 square feet, is nearly a third the size of the house.

During the faced-paced 1950s, designers marketed homes that could provide tranquility to their owners. As a rural population became urbanized, developers packaged their homes “for casual indoor-outdoor living.” The goal of mass-production—including architecture—is to appeal to everyone.

One storyLow pitched, gable roofDeep-set eaves with roof overhangAsymmetric facadeVisually low to the groundContrasting sidingLarge, irregularly-shaped windowsProminent chimney, similar to the “Level III” designCorner windows and a sense of airiness

During the 1950s, real estate developers were eager to sell dreams of family and home ownership to GI soldiers returning from WWII. As you look through these plans, consider the ways ranch-style housing remains a popular and practical choice. With no stairs to a second floor, a ranch home—new or old—can be an ideal choice for homeowners who want to age in place.

One storyLow pitched hipped roof with one small front cross gable (compare with the “Gable” design plan)Deep-set eaves with roof overhang over front porchAsymmetric facadeLarge window wall facade, similar to the Starlight planProminent chimney and fireplace at the rear of the housePorch and terracesOpenness and airiness of design

“Level III” – Midcentury Split-Level Living Level III Seems to Be Designed With Only Two Levels and a Basement. Photo by Buyenlarge/Archive Photos/Getty Images (cropped)

The 1,011 square feet of living space seems to be on two levels, with the basement making up what they call this “Three Level Contemporary.” Never mind. It’s a beautiful example of mid-century modern split-level design.

The wide front gable of this design gives the illusion of great horizontal width that cannot be interrupted by the massive chimney. The option of no basement allows designers to include a utility room in the floor plan. The “Glory” design has a similar option.

One storyLow pitched, gable roofDeep-set eaves with roof overhangAsymmetric facadeHorizontal L-shaped layout – visually low to the groundContrasting sidingPicture windows and irregular types of windowsFireplaceIntegrated garage, similar to the “Ranchero” designPatios and porches

The option of no basement allows the designers of this house plan to add a utility room between the kitchen and garage. In the northeast, this may be called a “mud room,” a welcome space for children to strip off dirty clothes and put them directly into the washing machine. The “Modette” design also has a plan with a utility room.

One storyLow pitched, gable roofDeep-set eaves with roof overhangAsymmetric facadeHorizontal, rambling layout – visually “low” to the groundContrasting sidingLarge, irregular types of windowsBrick or stone working fireplace and a built-in wood boxAttached garage, as opposed to the integrated garage of the “Ranchero” planOpenness and airiness of design

The name of this design, “Ranchero,” describes the intent of the architect. The house plan’s living area, or floor space, is 1,342 square feet, but add to that 379 square feet of porch area—not to mention the 225 square foot garage.

Integrated garages were popular architectural features on mid-century ranch houses.

At 863 square feet, this very small, two-bedroom home appears to be mainly roof when the 234 square foot garage is added. The garage roof creates one side gable, and the “dining alcove” creates another gable.

The architecture of this hip-roofed split-level ranch is attractive inside and outside. The few steps up to the bedroom removes the children’s bedroom from the large, comfortable living areas. The huge chimney demands attention from passersby. What’s not to like?

Limit to Popular Style:ContemporaryCountryCraftsmanDirection Of Your ViewFront ViewSide ViewRear View

One storyLow pitched combination hip and gable roofDeep-set eaves with roof overhangAsymmetric facadeContrasting sidingIrregular types of large and small windowsBrick or stone fireplace with bookshelves built inAttached garage, similar to the “Starlight” planHorizontal layout with wide attached garage)Small front porchOpenness and airiness of design using corner windows

This plan is one of the few in this architectural series of postwar houses having a kitchen and dining alcove in the front of the house. Along with the unusual roof, this house may have appealed to people who wanted something a little different—but still the same as everyone else in the development.

The name “Starlight” conjures images of open air wagon trains, campfires, and shooting stars. For a population moving to live near urban work areas, marketing big sky country life was a real “Bonanza.”

The importance of the garage is pronounced by placing it at the front of the home, with the dining room and kitchen behind. A small porch off the eating area, in addition to two larger porches, makes the “Ranchero” seem like an upscale camp. Integrated garages were very common to mid-century ranch houses.

This home design is not only a modern ranch, but it is also a flexibly designed ranch. Alternate plans let the homeowner select the placement of the bathroom and utility room. The dining room could easily be converted into another bedroom, den, or home office. Dreams and possibilities are always marketable.

One storyLow pitched, gable roofDeep-set eaves with roof overhangAsymmetric facade (off-center front door)Horizontal, rambling layout – visually low to the groundContrasting siding (“Ranch House in Frame, Brick, and Stone”)Large, irregular types of windowsBrick or stone fireplaceIntegrated garage, similar to the “Glory” designPatios and porches with sliding glass doorsOpenness and airiness of design

Midcentury Modern design originated in the 1930s and became popular during the 1950s and 60s. These homes provided a contrast to the more traditional home styles like Craftsman or Victorian. Today, Midcentury Modern remains a popular design style. These homes are known for innovative layouts that feature open living areas and wide walls of windows, particularly to the rear of the home. A true Midcentury Modern home plan is all about making connections. The numerous windows connect you with the outdoors, while the open spaces inside the home allow its residents to connect with each other. Outside, Midcentury Modern homes offer plenty of curb appeal. Many designs resemble more traditional Ranch homes while others make use of flat or gently sloped roofs and asymmetric floor plans to create a truly unique look.

“Tranquility” – A Home With a Wall of Windows Tranquility Is Designed With a Wall of Windows for the Living / Dining Areas. Photo by Buyenlarge/Archive Photos/Getty Images (cropped)

3338 sq ft 3 bed 3.5 bath 1 story 104′ 10″ wide 93′ 10″ deep

Is Your Site Sloping?Upslope / Garage-UnderSidesloping LotDownslope / D’light BsmtWhich Building Type Do You need?Single Family DetachedDuplex / TownhomeGarage

“Grandette” – A Minimal Traditional Bungalow Ranch Grandette Is Described as a Western Bungalow, Perhaps Because of the Central Roof Overhang. Photo by Buyenlarge/Archive Photos/Getty Images (cropped)

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“Gables” – A Hip and Gable Modernity Gable and hip roof construction make this 1950s ranch-style house live up to its name: Gables. Photo © Buyenlarge/Getty Images. Select the image to view full size in a new window.

Low pitched, hipped roofDeep-set eaves with roof overhangAsymmetric facadeContrasting sidingLarge windows, modernized with glass block cornersProminent chimney, similar to the “Modette” designPatios with sliding glass doorsCorner windows and split levels create a sense of openness

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